Enough is Enough.

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Comments

  • MiesnerMan86MiesnerMan86 What is Life?Member Posts: 564
    I give up reading at like the 3rd post, can someone make a summary?
  • The_MarauderThe_Marauder eating yo foodMember Posts: 232

    I give up reading at like the 3rd post, can someone make a summary?

    Summary:
    We argued about how the Devs need to Do more, and talked about this "soon" the Devs mention. Also mentioned that the Devs have multiple jobs, etc etc., and might not have time 25/8 for this game. To wrap it all up, it ended with the montro of Let the Developers Develop, and the Players Play, because they owe no allegiance to this game, considering its their creation.
  • GrebebeGrebebe 2Fab4UMember Posts: 932
    edited September 17
    In my opinion, people have to stop getting their feelings hurt when others bash the devs. The demand for new updates and bug fixes started over a year ago, and people were kindly asking (with some exceptions of course), curious about what's being worked on behind the scenes. The answers given were mainly the "state of Deepworld posts". As time goes, the "State of Deepworld" posts accumulated, and people started to realise that they announced new projects, before delivering the promises made on the ones before that. Gradually, everyone's patience starts to fade away, and the questions that were first out of curiosity became demands -- and in my opinion, you can't blame anyone for losing patience at this point...
    The "soon" meme was the inside joke of the community, but it's only funny when it's a joke... not when you realise 'soon' really means never.

    I don't care about the devs leaving Deepworld to make a new game, I don't care about Deepworld not getting any updates anymore (I don't play it anyway), I -- and I think I can safely speak for everyone here -- want the best for them in life, and success for their company. However, a very important lesson is to be learned here, for them, and they just seem to overlook it -- TRANSPARENCY IS KEY, as @ChatotTheParrot has mentioned... If they communicated their decisions with us directly, explaining to us why some bugs aren't being fixed, why this and that isn't added yet etc, then no one would be so rude to them.
    I hate to say it, but they brought the negativity upon themselves. Although I truly love them, avoiding to answer questions at this critical point of their career is the biggest mistake they're making. Be honest with your audience/customers and you will have credibility. They weren't honest, so they lost credibility. So when everyone is hearing about the launch of a 'new game', of course most are laughing at them. Of course there's criticism. Stop making excuses for them, that's not how they'll learn. The only way for this company to actually be successful is if they recognise their mistake with Deepworld, and communicate with their customers for their next game. If you keep on defending them, they won't see their flaws.


    EDIT: If you really care about Mike, Jason and Lisa, you would let them learn. When you're a parent, there are some times where your child is going to mess up, and make a mistake. You love your child more than anything, but if you learn he's a bully at school, you won't comfort him saying it's the other kid's faults for being soft. You get angry at him, and he learns. Same idea here.
  • MiesnerMan86MiesnerMan86 What is Life?Member Posts: 564
    Well then. Thanks
  • InceptionInception Hello Darling Member Posts: 394
    Grebebe said:

    In my opinion, people have to stop getting their feelings hurt when others bash the devs. The demand for new updates and bug fixes started over a year ago, and people were kindly asking (with some exceptions of course), curious about what's being worked on behind the scenes. The answers given were mainly the "state of Deepworld posts". As time goes, the "State of Deepworld" posts accumulated, and people started to realise that they announced new projects, before delivering the promises made on the ones before that. Gradually, everyone's patience starts to fade away, and the questions that were first out of curiosity became demands -- and in my opinion, you can't blame anyone for losing patience at this point...
    The "soon" meme was the inside joke of the community, but it's only funny when it's a joke... not when you realise 'soon' really means never.

    I don't care about the devs leaving Deepworld to make a new game, I don't care about Deepworld not getting any updates anymore (I don't play it anyway), I -- and I think I can safely speak for everyone here -- want the best for them in life, and success for their company. However, a very important lesson is to be learned here, for them, and they just seem to overlook it -- TRANSPARENCY IS KEY, as @ChatotTheParrot has mentioned... If they communicated their decisions with us directly, explaining to us why some bugs aren't being fixed, why this and that isn't added yet etc, then no one would be so rude to them.
    I hate to say it, but they brought the negativity upon themselves. Although I truly love them, avoiding to answer questions at this critical point of their career is the biggest mistake they're making. Be honest with your audience/customers and you will have credibility. They weren't honest, so they lost credibility. So when everyone is hearing about the launch of a 'new game', of course most are laughing at them. Of course there's criticism. Stop making excuses for them, that's not how they'll learn. The only way for this company to actually be successful is if they recognise their mistake with Deepworld, and communicate with their customers for their next game. If you keep on defending them, they won't see their flaws.


    EDIT: If you really care about Mike, Jason and Lisa, you would let them learn. When you're a parent, there are some times where your child is going to mess up, and make a mistake. You love your child more than anything, but if you learn he's a bully at school, you won't comfort him saying it's the other kid's faults for being soft. You get angry at him, and he learns. Same idea here.

    We aren't their parents and it's not our job to teach them. Besides I'm sure they know more about running a game than people who never have.
  • The_MarauderThe_Marauder eating yo foodMember Posts: 232
    Grebebe said:

    In my opinion, people have to stop getting their feelings hurt when others bash the devs. The demand for new updates and bug fixes started over a year ago, and people were kindly asking (with some exceptions of course), curious about what's being worked on behind the scenes. The answers given were mainly the "state of Deepworld posts". As time goes, the "State of Deepworld" posts accumulated, and people started to realise that they announced new projects, before delivering the promises made on the ones before that. Gradually, everyone's patience starts to fade away, and the questions that were first out of curiosity became demands -- and in my opinion, you can't blame anyone for losing patience at this point...
    The "soon" meme was the inside joke of the community, but it's only funny when it's a joke... not when you realise 'soon' really means never.

    I don't care about the devs leaving Deepworld to make a new game, I don't care about Deepworld not getting any updates anymore (I don't play it anyway), I -- and I think I can safely speak for everyone here -- want the best for them in life, and success for their company. However, a very important lesson is to be learned here, for them, and they just seem to overlook it -- TRANSPARENCY IS KEY, as @ChatotTheParrot has mentioned... If they communicated their decisions with us directly, explaining to us why some bugs aren't being fixed, why this and that isn't added yet etc, then no one would be so rude to them.
    I hate to say it, but they brought the negativity upon themselves. Although I truly love them, avoiding to answer questions at this critical point of their career is the biggest mistake they're making. Be honest with your audience/customers and you will have credibility. They weren't honest, so they lost credibility. So when everyone is hearing about the launch of a 'new game', of course most are laughing at them. Of course there's criticism. Stop making excuses for them, that's not how they'll learn. The only way for this company to actually be successful is if they recognise their mistake with Deepworld, and communicate with their customers for their next game. If you keep on defending them, they won't see their flaws.


    EDIT: If you really care about Mike, Jason and Lisa, you would let them learn. When you're a parent, there are some times where your child is going to mess up, and make a mistake. You love your child more than anything, but if you learn he's a bully at school, you won't comfort him saying it's the other kid's faults for being soft. You get angry at him, and he learns. Same idea here.

    Not hating on your post bud, but they've had years to learn, and repetitively do the exact same thing - year after year. There's no learning process when all you do is neglect it
  • GrebebeGrebebe 2Fab4UMember Posts: 932
    edited September 18
    Inception said:

    Grebebe said:

    In my opinion, people have to stop getting their feelings hurt when others bash the devs. The demand for new updates and bug fixes started over a year ago, and people were kindly asking (with some exceptions of course), curious about what's being worked on behind the scenes. The answers given were mainly the "state of Deepworld posts". As time goes, the "State of Deepworld" posts accumulated, and people started to realise that they announced new projects, before delivering the promises made on the ones before that. Gradually, everyone's patience starts to fade away, and the questions that were first out of curiosity became demands -- and in my opinion, you can't blame anyone for losing patience at this point...
    The "soon" meme was the inside joke of the community, but it's only funny when it's a joke... not when you realise 'soon' really means never.

    I don't care about the devs leaving Deepworld to make a new game, I don't care about Deepworld not getting any updates anymore (I don't play it anyway), I -- and I think I can safely speak for everyone here -- want the best for them in life, and success for their company. However, a very important lesson is to be learned here, for them, and they just seem to overlook it -- TRANSPARENCY IS KEY, as @ChatotTheParrot has mentioned... If they communicated their decisions with us directly, explaining to us why some bugs aren't being fixed, why this and that isn't added yet etc, then no one would be so rude to them.
    I hate to say it, but they brought the negativity upon themselves. Although I truly love them, avoiding to answer questions at this critical point of their career is the biggest mistake they're making. Be honest with your audience/customers and you will have credibility. They weren't honest, so they lost credibility. So when everyone is hearing about the launch of a 'new game', of course most are laughing at them. Of course there's criticism. Stop making excuses for them, that's not how they'll learn. The only way for this company to actually be successful is if they recognise their mistake with Deepworld, and communicate with their customers for their next game. If you keep on defending them, they won't see their flaws.


    EDIT: If you really care about Mike, Jason and Lisa, you would let them learn. When you're a parent, there are some times where your child is going to mess up, and make a mistake. You love your child more than anything, but if you learn he's a bully at school, you won't comfort him saying it's the other kid's faults for being soft. You get angry at him, and he learns. Same idea here.

    We aren't their parents and it's not our job to teach them. Besides I'm sure they know more about running a game than people who never have.
    Just clarifying; I'm not saying we are their parents and I'm not saying they're the equivalent of kids. The analogy was simply there to explain why the learning process is so important
    Also, in no way do I have the arrogance to believe I know how to run a game better than them, and therefore am qualified to teach them. I'm simply stating that defending them at this critical point isn't the right thing to do, instead let them learn from their own mistake* (not from us teaching them anything -- i appreciate the clarification)

    EDIT: However, I just want to add that there's no school that teaches you how to run a game, or make a game. The devs didn't take 'run online games' classes. They don't have an 'Official Game-Developping Degree' It's all from experience and instinct. Sure they have more experience running a game themselves, but as gamers, we also do have experience with games... And I've played enough to confidently say that one of the biggest issues with the company is the lack of communication... It's not our job to teach them anything sure, but it's also not our job to bash on critics? it's actually part of their job to manage questions and demands, but all this time we've taken their role by constantly pulling out the 'they're only 2 working on it', 'they're humans not robots'. You say we aren't their parents, but people keep on spoon-feeding them, handling the 'haters', and explaining their problems instead of them. They're adults, let them answer, and if they don't -- speak out against it. Nothing wrong with that.
    Post edited by Grebebe on
  • zombiecatcherzombiecatcher Playing Growtopia as zombiekillhaMember Posts: 707
    Grebebe said:

    Inception said:

    Grebebe said:

    In my opinion, people have to stop getting their feelings hurt when others bash the devs. The demand for new updates and bug fixes started over a year ago, and people were kindly asking (with some exceptions of course), curious about what's being worked on behind the scenes. The answers given were mainly the "state of Deepworld posts". As time goes, the "State of Deepworld" posts accumulated, and people started to realise that they announced new projects, before delivering the promises made on the ones before that. Gradually, everyone's patience starts to fade away, and the questions that were first out of curiosity became demands -- and in my opinion, you can't blame anyone for losing patience at this point...
    The "soon" meme was the inside joke of the community, but it's only funny when it's a joke... not when you realise 'soon' really means never.

    I don't care about the devs leaving Deepworld to make a new game, I don't care about Deepworld not getting any updates anymore (I don't play it anyway), I -- and I think I can safely speak for everyone here -- want the best for them in life, and success for their company. However, a very important lesson is to be learned here, for them, and they just seem to overlook it -- TRANSPARENCY IS KEY, as @ChatotTheParrot has mentioned... If they communicated their decisions with us directly, explaining to us why some bugs aren't being fixed, why this and that isn't added yet etc, then no one would be so rude to them.
    I hate to say it, but they brought the negativity upon themselves. Although I truly love them, avoiding to answer questions at this critical point of their career is the biggest mistake they're making. Be honest with your audience/customers and you will have credibility. They weren't honest, so they lost credibility. So when everyone is hearing about the launch of a 'new game', of course most are laughing at them. Of course there's criticism. Stop making excuses for them, that's not how they'll learn. The only way for this company to actually be successful is if they recognise their mistake with Deepworld, and communicate with their customers for their next game. If you keep on defending them, they won't see their flaws.


    EDIT: If you really care about Mike, Jason and Lisa, you would let them learn. When you're a parent, there are some times where your child is going to mess up, and make a mistake. You love your child more than anything, but if you learn he's a bully at school, you won't comfort him saying it's the other kid's faults for being soft. You get angry at him, and he learns. Same idea here.

    We aren't their parents and it's not our job to teach them. Besides I'm sure they know more about running a game than people who never have.
    Just clarifying; I'm not saying we are their parents and I'm not saying they're the equivalent of kids. The analogy was simply there to explain why the learning process is so important
    Also, in no way do I have the arrogance to believe I know how to run a game better than them, and therefore am qualified to teach them. I'm simply stating that defending them at this critical point isn't the right thing to do, instead let them learn from their own mistake* (not from us teaching them anything -- i appreciate the clarification)

    EDIT: However, I just want to add that there's no school that teaches you how to run a game, or make a game. The devs didn't take 'run online games' classes. They don't have an 'Official Game-Developping Degree' It's all from experience and instinct. Sure they have more experience running a game themselves, but as gamers, we also do have experience with games... And I've played enough to confidently say that one of the biggest issues with the company is the lack of communication... It's not our job to teach them anything sure, but it's also not our job to bash on critics? it's actually part of their job to manage questions and demands, but all this time we've taken their role by constantly pulling out the 'they're only 2 working on it', 'they're humans not robots'. You say we aren't their parents, but people keep on spoon-feeding them, handling the 'haters', and explaining their problems instead of them. They're adults, let them answer, and if they don't -- speak out against it. Nothing wrong with that.
    You summed everything up perfectly in this and the last post, I have been playing this game for quite a long time in 2 accounts before I quit my newest one.
    When I made my first account, (hard to remember, so I am probably off by a bit), the old graphics were just being replaced with these new ones, I remember some giveaways, and having fun times.
    I came to the game in about 2014-2015 with my new account, I played for a year before being hacked, the game was doing okay when I started, but I could see there was some chaos. By the time I was hacked, people were already complaining. I come here and lurk here every 1-2 months, and I have seen this game at its 'peak' and at it's downfall. It's really sad, and I hope this game doesn't fall, until then, I will probably just play another game with people at least attempting to work on the game. :(
  • Dominus_MortisDominus_Mortis Ļ̴̛̤̩̙͕̥̠̪̗̭̲̪͕̻̇̆̆̅͋̅̒͋̂̅̎͘͝ͅo̴͙͔̭̰̙̼͕̗͇̗̩͇̳̮̦̗̰͙̭͇͑͝ĺ̶͍͛̐̓͆Member Posts: 775

    Grebebe said:

    Inception said:

    Grebebe said:

    In my opinion, people have to stop getting their feelings hurt when others bash the devs. The demand for new updates and bug fixes started over a year ago, and people were kindly asking (with some exceptions of course), curious about what's being worked on behind the scenes. The answers given were mainly the "state of Deepworld posts". As time goes, the "State of Deepworld" posts accumulated, and people started to realise that they announced new projects, before delivering the promises made on the ones before that. Gradually, everyone's patience starts to fade away, and the questions that were first out of curiosity became demands -- and in my opinion, you can't blame anyone for losing patience at this point...
    The "soon" meme was the inside joke of the community, but it's only funny when it's a joke... not when you realise 'soon' really means never.

    I don't care about the devs leaving Deepworld to make a new game, I don't care about Deepworld not getting any updates anymore (I don't play it anyway), I -- and I think I can safely speak for everyone here -- want the best for them in life, and success for their company. However, a very important lesson is to be learned here, for them, and they just seem to overlook it -- TRANSPARENCY IS KEY, as @ChatotTheParrot has mentioned... If they communicated their decisions with us directly, explaining to us why some bugs aren't being fixed, why this and that isn't added yet etc, then no one would be so rude to them.
    I hate to say it, but they brought the negativity upon themselves. Although I truly love them, avoiding to answer questions at this critical point of their career is the biggest mistake they're making. Be honest with your audience/customers and you will have credibility. They weren't honest, so they lost credibility. So when everyone is hearing about the launch of a 'new game', of course most are laughing at them. Of course there's criticism. Stop making excuses for them, that's not how they'll learn. The only way for this company to actually be successful is if they recognise their mistake with Deepworld, and communicate with their customers for their next game. If you keep on defending them, they won't see their flaws.


    EDIT: If you really care about Mike, Jason and Lisa, you would let them learn. When you're a parent, there are some times where your child is going to mess up, and make a mistake. You love your child more than anything, but if you learn he's a bully at school, you won't comfort him saying it's the other kid's faults for being soft. You get angry at him, and he learns. Same idea here.

    We aren't their parents and it's not our job to teach them. Besides I'm sure they know more about running a game than people who never have.
    Just clarifying; I'm not saying we are their parents and I'm not saying they're the equivalent of kids. The analogy was simply there to explain why the learning process is so important
    Also, in no way do I have the arrogance to believe I know how to run a game better than them, and therefore am qualified to teach them. I'm simply stating that defending them at this critical point isn't the right thing to do, instead let them learn from their own mistake* (not from us teaching them anything -- i appreciate the clarification)

    EDIT: However, I just want to add that there's no school that teaches you how to run a game, or make a game. The devs didn't take 'run online games' classes. They don't have an 'Official Game-Developping Degree' It's all from experience and instinct. Sure they have more experience running a game themselves, but as gamers, we also do have experience with games... And I've played enough to confidently say that one of the biggest issues with the company is the lack of communication... It's not our job to teach them anything sure, but it's also not our job to bash on critics? it's actually part of their job to manage questions and demands, but all this time we've taken their role by constantly pulling out the 'they're only 2 working on it', 'they're humans not robots'. You say we aren't their parents, but people keep on spoon-feeding them, handling the 'haters', and explaining their problems instead of them. They're adults, let them answer, and if they don't -- speak out against it. Nothing wrong with that.
    You summed everything up perfectly in this and the last post, I have been playing this game for quite a long time in 2 accounts before I quit my newest one.
    When I made my first account, (hard to remember, so I am probably off by a bit), the old graphics were just being replaced with these new ones, I remember some giveaways, and having fun times.
    I came to the game in about 2014-2015 with my new account, I played for a year before being hacked, the game was doing okay when I started, but I could see there was some chaos. By the time I was hacked, people were already complaining. I come here and lurk here every 1-2 months, and I have seen this game at its 'peak' and at it's downfall. It's really sad, and I hope this game doesn't fall, until then, I will probably just play another game with people at least attempting to work on the game. :(
    ''Twas a good speech. Ah my days at Build World feel like they were only yesterday.
  • zombiecatcherzombiecatcher Playing Growtopia as zombiekillhaMember Posts: 707
    ShiroNai said:

    Most of what I've wanted to say has been said already, but I'll share my piece regardless. I'm nearing the 5th anniversary of my DW account this December, and I still can't believe how things have changed over the years. I can recall having 9+ worlds cycling through in the popular tab having over 20 players each. But as players started hitting "endgame" (Completed all achievements, collected all the weapons, etc.), more and more people got bored. And I can't blame them. With how infrequently updates come, it's not a surprise to anyone. It's if your favorite game promised bug fixes and lots of new playable content in the DLC, but the DLC was never given a release date and has been announced 2 years ago. I'm not saying it's an easy task to work on a game that was as large as DW with only 2 developers and 2 admins, but it'd be nice if the playerbase was informed of when content will be released and to have those deadlines met.

    Take Destiny 2 for instance; for the first month of it's release, it has a content road map of what can be expected to happen each week. Worldly events occur every other week to about once a month. Not to mention every week there is an update of what's being worked on. "This Week at Bungie" as it's titled basically gives the run down of what bugs are being looked into, content that's being worked on as well as player shoutouts for creations they've submitted. Now, I'm not expecting Bytebin to release content every week or fix bugs within the week as that's unfair comparing them to a company that's quite a bit larger than they are, but having a bit of an insight into what's being worked on at least once a month wouldn't hurt anyone, would it?

    Here's a reference to the monthly roadmap of content I spoke about earlier.
    image

    Absolutely agree, plus a slightly hypocritical muting and banning system. One player got banned for saying something not that bad, but everyone took it way too seriously. I have seen people not getting punished at all for saying things unbelievably bad. I think the system we have should be changed. It's just 'tattle and get the bully banned'. Now, if you're going to argue with me, saying that I should have reported them. I'm just taking a perspective of someone else, as someone who is slightly sociopathic, I don't really get offended by statements.
  • DebatorDebator dabbing on the hatersMember Posts: 554

    ShiroNai said:

    Most of what I've wanted to say has been said already, but I'll share my piece regardless. I'm nearing the 5th anniversary of my DW account this December, and I still can't believe how things have changed over the years. I can recall having 9+ worlds cycling through in the popular tab having over 20 players each. But as players started hitting "endgame" (Completed all achievements, collected all the weapons, etc.), more and more people got bored. And I can't blame them. With how infrequently updates come, it's not a surprise to anyone. It's if your favorite game promised bug fixes and lots of new playable content in the DLC, but the DLC was never given a release date and has been announced 2 years ago. I'm not saying it's an easy task to work on a game that was as large as DW with only 2 developers and 2 admins, but it'd be nice if the playerbase was informed of when content will be released and to have those deadlines met.

    Take Destiny 2 for instance; for the first month of it's release, it has a content road map of what can be expected to happen each week. Worldly events occur every other week to about once a month. Not to mention every week there is an update of what's being worked on. "This Week at Bungie" as it's titled basically gives the run down of what bugs are being looked into, content that's being worked on as well as player shoutouts for creations they've submitted. Now, I'm not expecting Bytebin to release content every week or fix bugs within the week as that's unfair comparing them to a company that's quite a bit larger than they are, but having a bit of an insight into what's being worked on at least once a month wouldn't hurt anyone, would it?

    Here's a reference to the monthly roadmap of content I spoke about earlier.
    image

    Absolutely agree, plus a slightly hypocritical muting and banning system. One player got banned for saying something not that bad, but everyone took it way too seriously. I have seen people not getting punished at all for saying things unbelievably bad. I think the system we have should be changed. It's just 'tattle and get the bully banned'. Now, if you're going to argue with me, saying that I should have reported them. I'm just taking a perspective of someone else, as someone who is slightly sociopathic, I don't really get offended by statements.
    Not only is that last statement incredibly edgy giving some examples for the "little things" these people were banned for would clear things up
  • zombiecatcherzombiecatcher Playing Growtopia as zombiekillhaMember Posts: 707
    Debator said:

    ShiroNai said:

    Most of what I've wanted to say has been said already, but I'll share my piece regardless. I'm nearing the 5th anniversary of my DW account this December, and I still can't believe how things have changed over the years. I can recall having 9+ worlds cycling through in the popular tab having over 20 players each. But as players started hitting "endgame" (Completed all achievements, collected all the weapons, etc.), more and more people got bored. And I can't blame them. With how infrequently updates come, it's not a surprise to anyone. It's if your favorite game promised bug fixes and lots of new playable content in the DLC, but the DLC was never given a release date and has been announced 2 years ago. I'm not saying it's an easy task to work on a game that was as large as DW with only 2 developers and 2 admins, but it'd be nice if the playerbase was informed of when content will be released and to have those deadlines met.

    Take Destiny 2 for instance; for the first month of it's release, it has a content road map of what can be expected to happen each week. Worldly events occur every other week to about once a month. Not to mention every week there is an update of what's being worked on. "This Week at Bungie" as it's titled basically gives the run down of what bugs are being looked into, content that's being worked on as well as player shoutouts for creations they've submitted. Now, I'm not expecting Bytebin to release content every week or fix bugs within the week as that's unfair comparing them to a company that's quite a bit larger than they are, but having a bit of an insight into what's being worked on at least once a month wouldn't hurt anyone, would it?

    Here's a reference to the monthly roadmap of content I spoke about earlier.
    image

    Absolutely agree, plus a slightly hypocritical muting and banning system. One player got banned for saying something not that bad, but everyone took it way too seriously. I have seen people not getting punished at all for saying things unbelievably bad. I think the system we have should be changed. It's just 'tattle and get the bully banned'. Now, if you're going to argue with me, saying that I should have reported them. I'm just taking a perspective of someone else, as someone who is slightly sociopathic, I don't really get offended by statements.
    Not only is that last statement incredibly edgy giving some examples for the "little things" these people were banned for would clear things up
    Because I'm Edgy Lord (Dabs and sneezes) i luv jake paul too, no i wont give examples bcuz im dank B)
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